The Relationship Between Worry, Trust, and Eternity
Worry

It happens all too frequently. I sing praises to God on Sunday morning and wake early on Monday morning beset by worry.

The cause might be my growing to-do list. Or circumstances outside my control. It could be due to loss and grief. Actually, the reason is less important than my response.

Worry. Anxiousness.

It comes in the form of a thought life that constantly imagines the worst possible outcome for any situation. I might worry about health, finances, relationships, safety, or any of a hundred other topics.

When I find myself worrying, it means several things.

First, I’m depending on myself. Specifically, I’ve fallen into the trap of thinking that outcomes are dependent on my own ability.

Being consumed by worry also takes me out of the present. Instead of enjoying today, I’m too busy obsessing about tomorrow.

And depending on myself means I’m not trusting God. Worry means I believe the lie that God is not working for my ultimate good and His eternal glory.

Antidote to Worry

The antidote to worry is to remember who we belong to.

And that leads to understanding what salvation in Christ really means. Our salvation has 3 components:

Past

At the moment we trust Jesus Christ as our personal Lord and Savior God declares us justified in His sight (Romans 5:1). Justification means we have a right standing before God. His wrath is no longer directed toward our sin, for Jesus “drank” the full cup of God’s wrath against sin when He died on the cross for us.

So I have no need to worry about the past. As a Christian, my past has been covered by the substitutionary sacrifice of Jesus Christ.

Present

But God did not stop at addressing our past. He also addresses our present. Every committed believer in Jesus Christ has the indwelling presence of the Holy Spirit (II Thess. 2:13). The Holy Spirit does the work of sanctification in our life—a  lifelong process of becoming what God has declared us to be: righteous!

So I have not need to worry about the present. God is at work in my life to make me more like His Son. And He will use every situation in my life toward that end.

Future

Finally, we look forward to an amazing future. At the moment a Christian dies, he or she is immediately in the presence of God. As the apostle Paul said, “To live is Christ and to die is gain” (Philippians 1:21). Our glorification includes having glorified bodies, free from even the temptation of sin.

 

Understanding the full breadth of our salvation reminds us God is in control, so there’s nothing to worry about. Whatever happens in this life is both temporary and will be used by our heavenly Father for our good and His glory.

Kick worry to the door and replace it with trust in the Lord who has us covered: past, present, and future!


My Favorite Bible Verse…or Not
trust the light to our path

The world around us is becoming increasingly challenging.

  • Challenging to live out our Christian faith in a morally relativistic culture.
  • Challenging to share the joy of our faith in a world that is not only uninterested, but hostile to a biblical world view.
  • And challenging as we face the uncertainty of a future that seems perilously out of control.

What do you do when you feel challenged?

Where do you go for answers?

How do you decide on the right course of action?

If I’m being smart, I go to the Bible for direction and answers. Sometimes I like what I read. Other times I’m stretched by what I read, knowing the answer does not line up with my natural inclinations.

For example, one of my favorite—and least favorite—verses is the same verse.

“Your word is a lamp to my feet and a light to my path” (Psalm 119:105 ESV).

This one verse answers several questions, including the source for answers and the kind of help God provides for guidance.

At face value, this verse sounds like everything we would want, including light and leading. Of course, I’m grateful for the direction this verse promises God’s children.

But (true confession) there’s one particular thing I don’t like about this verse. If I’m being honest, I don’t want a lamp to my feet. A lamp only lights the way a few feet in front of me. It lights the path step by step.

I don’t want a lamp for the next few steps. I want a floodlight that lights the way for a mile down the road. I don’t want direction just for today. I want to know what the next year (or two or three) holds.

But God gives me what I need, not necessarily what I want.

What I need is to learn dependence on God. Sadly, it’s easier for me to trust Him for my eternal salvation in Christ—my eternal destiny—than it is to trust Him in the physical trials of life.

According to Psalm 119:105, God gives just enough direction to move forward with dependence on Him. And coincidentally, that’s what prompts trust, which just happens to be my “one word” for the year.

Conversations with friends have shown me I’m not alone in wanting to know what lies around the bend next month…next year…next decade. And actually, isn’t that the reason people flock to fortune tellers, read horoscopes, and visit palm readers?

We’re under the illusion that if we know what’s coming, somehow we can control it. As if a certain level of control will solve all our problems. But the biggest problem is that control is, itself, an illusion. We can’t control the weather, the culture, or how other people respond to us.

And to make matters worse, most of us aren’t even successful controlling ourselves!

Ever lost your temper? Said something you wish you could take back? Or maybe not said something you wish you had?

Control may be what we want, but dependence is what we need. Dependence on the One who created us and sustains us if we run to Him. Trusting that if God has given us all we need in Christ for our eternal relationship to be restored, surely He can be trusted for the here and now.

The Father has restored us through the sacrifice of His Son, Jesus, and the Son has left us His Spirit, equipping us to grow in our intimacy with Him and to live a life pleasing to Him.

In short, He has already given us everything we need. So why does that not seem to be enough?

Perhaps it’s because, deep down, we’re afraid to trust. Afraid God doesn’t define good the way we do. Let’s face it, we define good as what we want: people and possessions. But God defines good as the people and processes He uses to make us more like Him.

Part of that process is cultivating trust. And trust is cultivated with just enough light for one step at a time.

Like I said…my favorite—and least favorite—verse!

What is your favorite or least favorite Bible verse? Why?


One Word for 2019
Trust

Do you make new year’s resolutions? I used to. But I was as successful as 80% of Americans who, according to U.S. News, make and break their new year’s resolutions by mid-February.

So several years ago I gave up resolutions. Instead, I began the practice of adopting one word for the year. One word to help maintain a right focus. To filter my experiences. A word to help me grow emotionally and spiritually. In past years my words included release, joy, hope, and gratitude.

It seems my one word becomes more challenging each year. Last year began with gratitude—a word that tested me in ways I could not have imagined. Because of great loss, part of me wishes those events never happened. But I also witnessed—and learned—a sense of gratitude that plumbed the depths of my spirit and carried me to new heights as I watched God glorify His name.

This year, my word is the most difficult one yet.

Trust.

Even typing the word is a bit scary.

I’ve always thought I was pretty good at trusting God. Good at encouraging and teaching others to trust Him, too. And no matter how complicated life became, I knew God was in control.

But now? Now is (cliché alert!):

  • when I put my money where my mouth is.
  • where the rubber meets the road.
  • when push comes to shove.

You get the idea.

This is the year where my ability to trust God will be tested more than ever.

The year in which everything has changed and nothing’s the same.

When most decisions I make will lead me into uncharted territory.

Where I must trust God for not just the things I need, but to be my husband and father. My encourager and comforter. My All-sufficient One.

And the year when listening to the still, small voice of the Holy Spirit will be more important than ever.

I’ve trusted God for eternal life. Now 2019 will reveal the depth of my trust in Him for everything else.

Do you choose one word for the year?


The People of Christmas: Those Who Trust

Letters Spelling Trust As Symbol for Faith And BeliefI trust the sun will rise tomorrow morning.

I trust gravity will keep my feet anchored to the floor when I get out of bed.

I trust the light will turn on when I flip the electric switch.

There is a slight chance that one or all of those things may not happen. But given my past experience, the probability is that they will occur…just as I trust they will.

But is it trust on my part, or is it simply a reliance on past experience?

What if I had never experienced a sunrise? Or if I had never known the effects of gravity? Or if I didn’t know what electricity was? Then it really would be trust!

With that in mind, consider the account of the first Christmas from the perspective of the participants.

Mary was asked to trust that God would do the impossible: cause her to become pregnant by His Spirit.
Joseph was asked to trust that God would do the impossible: cause his fiancée to be pregnant while still a faithful virgin.
Mary’s parents were asked to trust that God would do the impossible: send His angel to communicate with their daughter—not just a female, which would have been unthinkable as it is, but barely a child herself.

Each of these people were asked to trust God in unusual circumstances without any direct experience to draw on.

A virgin birth? Never happened before.

Angels speaking to women? Unthinkable. It rarely even happened to men.

A woman pregnant outside of marriage? Counter-cultural at best and a violation of the Mosaic Law which required a death sentence (Deut. 22:20-21).

And yet, each of these people did trust God. Their hope rested on the character and ways of God, as He had revealed Himself in His Word. They expressed their faith and trust in the Lord despite situations that screamed,

Possible And Impossible Keys Show Optimism And Positivity“Run!”

“Don’t believe him!”

“Don’t believe her!”

“This is impossible!”

The essence of their trust and hope depended on having a high view of God. It depended on being absolutely convinced that nothing is impossible for El Elyon, the Most High God. Nothing is out of the control of the Sovereign Lord who never stopped being Lord of His creation.

What impossible situation are you facing today? Are you finding it difficult to trust the Lord? The higher your view of God—the bigger God is in your sight—the easier it will be to trust Him, regardless of how impossible your circumstances appear.

The angel told Mary, “Nothing will be impossible with God” (Luke 1:37, ESV). Jesus said, “with God all things are possible” (Matthew 19:26, ESV).

Do we truly believe this? The key to maintaining hope and trust this Christmas season and throughout the year, regardless of what comes, is to maintain a high view of God—the God for whom nothing is impossible.

Mary and Joseph trusted El Elyon. Will you and I do the same?