One Word for 2019
Trust

Do you make new year’s resolutions? I used to. But I was as successful as 80% of Americans who, according to U.S. News, make and break their new year’s resolutions by mid-February.

So several years ago I gave up resolutions. Instead, I began the practice of adopting one word for the year. One word to help maintain a right focus. To filter my experiences. A word to help me grow emotionally and spiritually. In past years my words included release, joy, hope, and gratitude.

It seems my one word becomes more challenging each year. Last year began with gratitude—a word that tested me in ways I could not have imagined. Because of great loss, part of me wishes those events never happened. But I also witnessed—and learned—a sense of gratitude that plumbed the depths of my spirit and carried me to new heights as I watched God glorify His name.

This year, my word is the most difficult one yet.

Trust.

Even typing the word is a bit scary.

I’ve always thought I was pretty good at trusting God. Good at encouraging and teaching others to trust Him, too. And no matter how complicated life became, I knew God was in control.

But now? Now is (cliché alert!):

  • when I put my money where my mouth is.
  • where the rubber meets the road.
  • when push comes to shove.

You get the idea.

This is the year where my ability to trust God will be tested more than ever.

The year in which everything has changed and nothing’s the same.

When most decisions I make will lead me into uncharted territory.

Where I must trust God for not just the things I need, but to be my husband and father. My encourager and comforter. My All-sufficient One.

And the year when listening to the still, small voice of the Holy Spirit will be more important than ever.

I’ve trusted God for eternal life. Now 2019 will reveal the depth of my trust in Him for everything else.

Do you choose one word for the year?


The People of Christmas: Those Who Trust

Letters Spelling Trust As Symbol for Faith And BeliefI trust the sun will rise tomorrow morning.

I trust gravity will keep my feet anchored to the floor when I get out of bed.

I trust the light will turn on when I flip the electric switch.

There is a slight chance that one or all of those things may not happen. But given my past experience, the probability is that they will occur…just as I trust they will.

But is it trust on my part, or is it simply a reliance on past experience?

What if I had never experienced a sunrise? Or if I had never known the effects of gravity? Or if I didn’t know what electricity was? Then it really would be trust!

With that in mind, consider the account of the first Christmas from the perspective of the participants.

Mary was asked to trust that God would do the impossible: cause her to become pregnant by His Spirit.
Joseph was asked to trust that God would do the impossible: cause his fiancée to be pregnant while still a faithful virgin.
Mary’s parents were asked to trust that God would do the impossible: send His angel to communicate with their daughter—not just a female, which would have been unthinkable as it is, but barely a child herself.

Each of these people were asked to trust God in unusual circumstances without any direct experience to draw on.

A virgin birth? Never happened before.

Angels speaking to women? Unthinkable. It rarely even happened to men.

A woman pregnant outside of marriage? Counter-cultural at best and a violation of the Mosaic Law which required a death sentence (Deut. 22:20-21).

And yet, each of these people did trust God. Their hope rested on the character and ways of God, as He had revealed Himself in His Word. They expressed their faith and trust in the Lord despite situations that screamed,

Possible And Impossible Keys Show Optimism And Positivity“Run!”

“Don’t believe him!”

“Don’t believe her!”

“This is impossible!”

The essence of their trust and hope depended on having a high view of God. It depended on being absolutely convinced that nothing is impossible for El Elyon, the Most High God. Nothing is out of the control of the Sovereign Lord who never stopped being Lord of His creation.

What impossible situation are you facing today? Are you finding it difficult to trust the Lord? The higher your view of God—the bigger God is in your sight—the easier it will be to trust Him, regardless of how impossible your circumstances appear.

The angel told Mary, “Nothing will be impossible with God” (Luke 1:37, ESV). Jesus said, “with God all things are possible” (Matthew 19:26, ESV).

Do we truly believe this? The key to maintaining hope and trust this Christmas season and throughout the year, regardless of what comes, is to maintain a high view of God—the God for whom nothing is impossible.

Mary and Joseph trusted El Elyon. Will you and I do the same?